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Yunnan Golden Pu Erh Tea

A true old-world delicacy! Known as either Pu-Erh or Pu Erh and pronounced as "poo-err." Pu-erh tea gets its name from a county located in China’s southern Yunnan province. Our Yunnan Golden Pur-erh tea has been aged for 5 years in a dark cave in China’s mountainous Yunnan region. The...
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$12.00

Spices Inc.

Gourmet Loose Leaf Tea

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A true old-world delicacy! Known as either Pu-Erh or Pu Erh and pronounced as "poo-err." Pu-erh tea gets its name from a county located in China’s southern Yunnan province. Our Yunnan Golden Pur-erh tea has been aged for 5 years in a dark cave in China’s mountainous Yunnan region. The aging process takes place in a relatively high humidity environment which mellows the elemental character of this tea when compared to young Pu-erh (which typically is aged 1 year). Young pu-erh is considered less flavorful and valuable whereas aged pu-erh is more highly prized. The mellower aged Yunnan Golden Pu-Erh tea tends to be preferred by western taste buds. The leaves come from the Yunnan Dayeh variety of tea tree. Dayeh is classified as a sub-variety of Camellia sinensis assamica, which has larger leaves than the small leaved Chinese variety plant (Camellia sinensis sinensis). Tea historians believe that the Yunnan Dayeh is closely related to the original tea tree of pre-glacial age. The troops of the Yuan Dynasty (led by Kublai Kahn who ruled from 1260 to 1294) are said to have introduced Pu-erh to the rest of China for its medicinal value. The tea leaves are plucked, rolled, withered in the hot sun and are then steamed and pressed into cakes. The steaming process generates some moisture when compressed (without drying) into the cakes, over the course of time the tea takes on an earthy and musty character. A good pu-erh gets somewhat moldy before it naturally dries and is considered the best quality. Our pu-erh has been broken up from the cakes to make it easier to use. Pu-erh is one of the five main types of tea (black, green, oolong and white being the others). Pu-erh tea is unique with its mild earthy flavor and woodsy notes and unlike all other teas, pu-erh is aged. In China, pu-erh tea is considered a black tea while what we consider a black tea is called red tea in China. There are two types of pu-er tea: shou (which means cooked or ripe) and sheng (meaning green or raw). Similar to wine, pu-erh is a "living" tea and it takes years to properly age but will hold its flavor and value for decades. About 40 years ago the ripe version was introduced to speed up the aging process. Ripe pu-erh is typically much darker and smoother than the raw pu-erh. Our Yunnan Golden Pu-erh tea is the shou variety of pu-erh. The flavor profile of our Yunnan Golden Pu-Erh tea is mellow with a hint of mustiness and an earthy character that is sometimes described as old or elemental. There is very little astringency and it will not get bitter with multiple infusions. If the flavor is too strong for you just dilute with water (this doesn't work for most other teas). The tea liquor is a reddish bronze. Low caffeine. High in antioxidants. Pu-erh is very versatile and can be infused numerous times. We like to steep at 195 degrees. You can steep pu-erh between 30 seconds and 30 minutes, though we prefer steeping for 2-3 minutes but as with any tea, experiment to find what suits you best. 1 oz produces 12+ cups (depending on how many infusions you prefer).

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